Zuccotti Park

It was more sophisticated than we had imagined: new documents show that the violent crackdown on Occupy last fall – so mystifying at the time – was not just coordinated at the level of the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security, and local police. The crackdown, which involved, as you may recall, violent arrests, group disruption, canister missiles to the skulls of protesters, people held in handcuffs so tight they were injured, people held in bondage till they were forced to wet or soil themselves –was coordinated with the big banks themselves.

The Partnership for Civil Justice Fund, in a groundbreaking scoop that should once more shame major US media outlets (why are nonprofits now some of the only entities in America left breaking major civil liberties news?), filed this request. The document – reproduced here in an easily searchable format – shows a terrifying network of coordinated DHS, FBI, police, regional fusion center, and private-sector activity so completely merged into one another that the monstrous whole is, in fact, one entity: in some cases, bearing a single name, the Domestic Security Alliance Council. And it reveals this merged entity to have one centrally planned, locally executed mission. The documents, in short, show the cops and DHS working for and with banks to target, arrest, and politically disable peaceful American citizens.

The documents, released after long delay in the week between Christmas and New Year, show a nationwide meta-plot unfolding in city after city in an Orwellian world: six American universities are sites where campus police funneled information about students involved with OWS to the FBI, with the administrations’ knowledge (p51); banks sat down with FBI officials to pool information about OWS protesters harvested by private security; plans to crush Occupy events, planned for a month down the road, were made by the FBI – and offered to the representatives of the same organizations that the protests would target; and even threats of the assassination of OWS leaders by sniper fire – by whom? Where? – now remain redacted and undisclosed to those American citizens in danger, contrary to standard FBI practice to inform the person concerned when there is a threat against a political leader (p61).

peterwknox:

at Zuccotti Park

peterwknox:

at Zuccotti Park

peterwknox:

dropfox:

Ask yourself, would a real network do something like this?
#FoxIsNotNews

Despicable.

Not cool.

peterwknox:

dropfox:

Ask yourself, would a real network do something like this?

#FoxIsNotNews

Despicable.

Not cool.

soupsoup:

The protesters will be allowed to return to Zuccotti Park, where they camped for the past two months, but will have to abide by the park rules — designed to prevent them from setting up a camp again — that included a ban on sleeping bags, tents and the storage of belongings in the space.

Rightfully so.

newsweek:

cheatsheet:

Collateral Damage: During an overnight raid of the Occupy Wall Street encampment at Zuccotti Park, police threw 5,000+ books from the OWS Library in the trash. (via boingboing, Buzzfeed).

Major bummer. We were there Sunday to give them 100 copies of the latest issue, which features a piece on Bill Maher’s embrace of OccupyLA and congress’s dirty habit of insider trading, and got to chat with the very nice, very dedicated librarians.

newsweek:

cheatsheet:

Collateral Damage: During an overnight raid of the Occupy Wall Street encampment at Zuccotti Park, police threw 5,000+ books from the OWS Library in the trash. (via boingboing, Buzzfeed).

Major bummer. We were there Sunday to give them 100 copies of the latest issue, which features a piece on Bill Maher’s embrace of OccupyLA and congress’s dirty habit of insider trading, and got to chat with the very nice, very dedicated librarians.

lorim:

capitalnewyork:

SCENES FROM THE RAID; BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER 

Before the raid had been called, Occupy Wall Street organizers had  planned a “day of action” on Nov. 17, in which the idea was going to be  to physically occupy Wall Street itself. Protesters vowed that if the  police raid was intended to thwart that plan, it had been a mistake.
Standing  outside Judson, Jeff Stark, 27, a member of the committee responsible  for planning the day, said, “Everyone expected it to happen after the  17th. I think it was a huge strategic error to empty the park before  then. That’s just going to get more people out on the streets. And not  being tied to one geographic location, the movement’s just going to get  stronger.”


Excellent reporting from Capital

lorim:

capitalnewyork:

SCENES FROM THE RAID; BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER

Before the raid had been called, Occupy Wall Street organizers had planned a “day of action” on Nov. 17, in which the idea was going to be to physically occupy Wall Street itself. Protesters vowed that if the police raid was intended to thwart that plan, it had been a mistake.

Standing outside Judson, Jeff Stark, 27, a member of the committee responsible for planning the day, said, “Everyone expected it to happen after the 17th. I think it was a huge strategic error to empty the park before then. That’s just going to get more people out on the streets. And not being tied to one geographic location, the movement’s just going to get stronger.”

Excellent reporting from Capital

nedhepburn:

Here’s every punk album cover for the next five years taken last night during the violent arrests at Zucotti Park. 

nedhepburn:

Here’s every punk album cover for the next five years taken last night during the violent arrests at Zucotti Park. 

capitalnewyork:

Unoccupied Zuccotti Park. Via Azi


Park looks great! Now people can come back and protest, if they want. You just can’t have people living like that in public space.

capitalnewyork:

Unoccupied Zuccotti Park. Via Azi

Park looks great! Now people can come back and protest, if they want. You just can’t have people living like that in public space.

This isn’t still relevant is it?